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Gisela von Wysocki

Wiesengrund

Stars are made from plasma and glass. Her father must know, as an astrophysicist famous far beyond the reaches of Salzburg. Yet Hanna Werbezirk still believes that they are eternal. And isn’t really inclined to serve him as an assistant in his astronomical lab. On a nightly radio show, she secretly listens to a series of lectures by an author whose name she’ll remember. Wisengrund. He could be helpful in resolving her question about the structure of stars. His words, nimble and versatile, provide her with a look into a world with very different laws. The feeling of complicity with the radiophone, nocturnal visitor make reading his works an event accompanied by butterflies in her stomach.

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Gisela von Wysocki

Making Music

Berlin’s Roaring Twenties and the history of the gramophone record, narrated as an éducation musicale by a pupil of Adorno

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Julia Zange

The Girls' Improvement Institution

Loretta's in her mid-twenties and about as grown up as Kate Moss. She knows what kind of clothes suit her, hangs out with arty types of people, does a fair cover version of hip Bohemian life. She's no shrinking violet, but when it comes to the practicalities of life she depends on her boyfriend.

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Raul Zelik

The Intruder

Daniel has hardly seen his father Fil over the past 15 years. But when he moves to Berlin to be closer to him, Fil becomes seriously ill, leaving his son alone again – with many questions and the key to Fil’s apartment.

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Serhij Zhadan

Anarchy in the UKR

»Forget politics, don't read the papers, don't go online, deny them your voice« - thus begins the 'Leftist March', a chapter of Serhiy Zhadan's second prose volume Anarchy in the UKR, the motto of which is derived from a song by the Sex Pistols.

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Russia (Amphora), France (Noir sur Blanc), Sweden (2244/Bonniers), Norway (Pax), Lithuania (Kitos Knygos), Poland (Czarne), Republic of Moldova / Romanian rights (Cartier)

Serhij Zhadan

Depeche Mode

A poet and novelist whose work has been variously compared to Rimbaud, Charles Bukowski and Irvine Welsh, Serhiy Zhadan’s first novel Depeche Mode depicts Ukrainian youth during the turbulent 1990s. Described by the author as »a book about real male comradeship,« the novel follows the unemployed narrator and his friends, Jewish anti-Semite Dogg Pavlov and Vasia the Communist, on their adventures around Kharkiv and beyond.

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English world rights (Glagoslav), Russia (Amphora), Italy (Castelvecchi), Sweden (2244/Bonniers), Poland (Czarne), Hungary (Europa), Bulgaria (Paradox), Lithuania (Kitos Knygos)

Serhij Zhadan

Voroshilovgrad

In expressive prose, Zhadan delivers a road novel from the edge of Europe that dares to dream the dream of freedom in a completely new way: as the search for home in a world without boundaries.

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English world rights (Deep Vellum), Russia (Astrel), Arabic world rights (Here&There), France (Noir sur Blanc), Italy (Voland), Netherlands (De Geus) Poland (Czarne), Hungary (Europa), Bulgaria (Paradox), Republic of Moldova / Romanian rights (Cartier), Latvia (Janis Roze), Slovenia (Beletrina), Belarus (Logvinau), Georgia (Intelekti)

Serhij Zhadan

Democratic Youth Anthem

San Sanytsch, a wrestler with a highschool diploma, joins the »Boxers for Justice and Social Adaptation« who form a brigade of security guards controlling the markets near the tractor factory. After he is almost killed testing the strength of a bulletproof vest, he decides to become the business partner of Goga, a former classmate who returned from the Chechen war and dreams of owning his own club. In a dilapidated sandwich shop named Bread-and-Butter Bar, they open the city's first gay club.

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Russia (Amphora), Poland (Czarne), Slovakia (Brak)

Serhij Zhadan

The Orphanage

The novel takes place in an urban environment in the southeast of Ukraine and is concerned with the more than three-year-long fight between the Ukrainian army and voluntary associations on the one side and pro-Russian separatists on the other. However, no underlying ideological accusations of guilt are dealt out. The book has to do with the pointlessness of war in the face of death, the physical and spiritual wounding of soldiers and civilians, and the destruction of both cities and the land itself. Despite all the disorientation this war brings out in those living in the region, in this novel the will to live is paramount.

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France (Noir sur Blanc), Poland (Czarne), Republic of Moldova / Romanian rights (Cartier), Georgia (Intelekti)

Serhij Zhadan

Mesopotamia

The setting of Serhiy Zhadan’s latest book is the Eastern Ukrainian city of Kharkiv, here and now, a modern Babylon: a city in Mesopotamia, set at the riverbank of diverse languages and cultures. In the West, there is the river Dnepr, in the East the Donez, a sidearm of the river Don – all of the rivers that could represent the Ukraine and Russia. Zhadan’s Kharkiv is a place that changes its shape in each of the short stories: a Russian, a Ukrainian, and a Tartarian version of this multilingual and multicultural city exist.

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English world rights (Yale UP), France (Noir sur Blanc), Italy (Voland), Denmark (Jensen & Dalgaard), Norway (Pax), Poland (Czarne), Georgia (Intelekti)
 

Ulf Erdmann Ziegler

Nothing White

This is the story of Marleen, who falls in love with the world of letters before she has even learnt to read. Born into a family of successful advertisers and illustrators, she dreams as a young child of something truly great: the perfect font.

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Ulf Erdmann Ziegler

And now it’s your turn, Orlando!

The touching story of a unique friendship and a perfectly penned declaration of love to the cinema.

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