On Ukraine

(15)

Juri Andruchowytsch

Secret

Rarely do the private and the political intertwine so closely as in this ironic portrait of an author who doesn't trust himself an inch.

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Juri Andruchowytsch

The Last Territory

On our literary map that is hardly even an outline of the Ukraine, the second largest country in Europe. Andruchowytsch, the internationally best known Ukraine author takes the limited knowledge of his audience in West Europe and the United States seriously and in a series of brilliant essays familiarizes them more closely with a forgotten region in Central Europe.

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Spanish world rights (Quaderns Crema/El Acantilado), Hungary (Racio)

Juri Andruchowytsch

Moscoviada

Moscoviada, Andruchowytsch’s most successful book, translated into many languages, was written in Spring 1992 on the banks of Lake Starnberg outside Munich – and is surprisingly topical today.

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USA (Spuyten Duyvil), Spanish world rights (Quaderns Crema), Russia (New Literary Review), France (Noir sur Blanc), Italy (Besa Editrice), Poland (Czarne), Czech Republic (FRA), Slovak Republic (Kalligram), Hungary (Gondolat), Bulgaria (Paradox), Romania (Allfa), Macedonia (Makedonska Rech), Belarus (ARCHE), Georgia (Bakur Sulakauri)

Juri Andruchowytsch

Perversion

The godchild of Rabelais and Bakhtin, Bulgakov and Esterházy, it is a whirligig of forms, styles, and apocryphal traditions – an adventure for readers who view life not as something to lament and despair over, but as something worth celebrating joyfully with a good book.

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USA (Northwestern UP), Spain (Quaderns Crema/El Acantilado), France (Noir sur Blanc), Russia (NLO), Finland (Loki Kirjat), Poland (Czarne), Bulgaria (Paradox), Serbia (Clio)

Juri Andruchowytsch

Twelve rings

In the 1990s, Karl-Joseph Zumbrunnen, an Austrian photographer with Galician roots, travels repeatedly through the Ukraine. The birth pangs of this new state, the incongruous mixture of brutally tasteless commercialization, backward Hutsul folklore, re-Sovietization and Habsburg nostalgia fascinates him.

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English world rights (Spuyten Duyvil), Spanish world rights (Quaderns Crema/El Acantilado), France (Noir sur Blanc), Poland (Czarne), Hungary (Gondolat), Bulgaria (Paradox), Romania (RAO), Lithuania (Lithuanian Writers), Croatia (Fraktura), Serbia ("Filip Visnjic")

Juri Andruchowytsch, Andrzej Stasiuk

My Europe

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Spanish world rights (Quaderns Crema/El Acantilado), France (Noir sur Blanc), Italy (print edition Mimesis / digital edition GoWare), Poland (Wydawictwo Czarne), Czech Republic (Periplum), Hungary (Kijarat), Romania (Polirom), Croatia (Fraktura)

Ljubko Deresch

Intent! Or the Mirror of Death

Ljubko Deresch is viewed as a foremost representative of post-Soviet Ukrainian literature alongside Yuri Andrukhovych and Serhiy Zhadan. In his novels he describes life in the fictive Carpathian town of Midni Buky with warring youth gangs, drug-taking excesses, and the gradual encroachment of Western pop culture. Many reviewers already see him as a literary heir to H. P. Lovecraft, Ambrose Bierce or Edgar Allen Poe.

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Mischa Gabowitsch

Putting Out Putin

The Russian parliamentary elections of December 2011 gave rise to a massive protest movement.

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English world rights (Polity)

Norman M. Naimark

Stalin’s Genocides

Many millions of innocent people died under Stalin’s rule. They were shot, starved or died during imprisonment or exile. In his extended essay, Norman M. Naimark narrates the devastating stories of systematic destruction.

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France (L'Arche Editeur), Japan (Misuzu Shobo), Estonia (Tänapäev), Ukraine (Kyiv-Mohyla Academy Publishing House)

Katja Petrowskaja

Maybe Esther

Was her name really Esther, her great-grandmother on her father’s side, who stayed behind in the empty apartment in Kiev in 1941, after her family had fled? And the Yiddish words with which she trustingly addressed the German soldiers – who was there to hear them? And when the soldiers shot the old babushka, »with routine indifference« – who was standing at the window, watching?

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English world rights (Harper Collins US; UK sublicense: Fourth Estate), Spanish world rights (Adriana Hidalgo), Brazilian Portuguese rights (Companhia das Letras), Portugal (Quetzal), France (Seuil), Italy (Adelphi), Netherlands (De Bezige Bij), Denmark (Tiderne Skifter), Sweden (Norstedts), Norway (Gyldendal Norsk), Finland (Tammi), Poland (Jagiellonian University Press), Slovakia (Premedia), Hungary (Magvetö), Bulgaria (Paradox), Romania (Humanitas), Estonia (Hea Lugu), Greece (Kapon), Ukraine (Knihy XXI)

Domestic Rights Sales: German Book Club rights (Büchergilde Gutenberg)

Mykola Rjabtschuk

Ukraine, Real and Imagined

What sort of a country was it in which elections were rigged, journalists murdered, and a presidential candidate poisoned during the election campaign?

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Philipp Ther

Europe since 1989

In 2014, Europe is in the grip of concerns and crises that have caused the optimism of 1989’s new beginnings to fade into distant memory. The New Order on the Old Continent explores correlations between the current situation in Europe and the new dawn arising after the fall of the Iron Curtain by shedding a different light on the end of communism, the revolutions of 1989-91 and the subsequent political and social transformations that gave rise to the »new Europe«. Current transformations are analyzed, not within the confines of Eastern Europe, but as a phenomenon affecting all EU Member States.

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English world rights (Princeton University Press), Spanish world rights (Plaza & Valdés), Poland (Kurhaus), Czech Republic (Libri), Bulgaria (KX Critique & Humanism), Ukraine (Laurus Press)

Serhij Zhadan

Anarchy in the UKR

»Forget politics, don't read the papers, don't go online, deny them your voice« - thus begins the 'Leftist March', a chapter of Serhiy Zhadan's second prose volume Anarchy in the UKR, the motto of which is derived from a song by the Sex Pistols.

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Russia (Amphora), France (Noir sur Blanc), Sweden (2244/Bonniers), Norway (Pax), Lithuania (Kitos Knygos), Poland (Czarne)

Serhij Zhadan

Voroshilovgrad

In expressive prose, Zhadan delivers a road novel from the edge of Europe that dares to dream the dream of freedom in a completely new way: as the search for home in a world without boundaries.

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English world rights (Deep Vellum), Russia (Astrel), France (Noir sur Blanc), Italy (Voland), Poland (Czarne), Hungary (Europa), Bulgaria (Paradox), Republic of Moldova / Romanian rights (Cartier), Latvia (Janis Roze), Slovenia (Beletrina), Belarus (Logvinau), Georgia (Intelekti)

Serhij Zhadan

Mesopotamia

The setting of Serhiy Zhadan’s latest book is the Eastern Ukrainian city of Kharkiv, here and now, a modern Babylon: a city in Mesopotamia, set at the riverbank of diverse languages and cultures. In the West, there is the river Dnepr, in the East the Donez, a sidearm of the river Don – all of the rivers that could represent the Ukraine and Russia. Zhadan’s Kharkiv is a place that changes its shape in each of the short stories: a Russian, a Ukrainian, and a Tartarian version of this multilingual and multicultural city exist.

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English world rights (Yale UP), France (Noir sur Blanc), Italy (Voland), Denmark (Jensen & Dalgaard), Norway (Pax), Poland (Czarne), Georgia (Intelekti)